The Irish Geological Association Posts

****LECTURE NEW DATE!****: 6th February 2019 – Paul Rondelez ( Director of the Irish Mining Heritage Trust) on “The Blast Furnace in 17th and 18th Century Ireland” ****WORKSHOP****: 16th February 2019 –  ACADEMIC POSTER MAKING WORKSHOP ****LECTURE****: Date TBC – Niall Reenan on IT in Geology ****LECTURE****: 1st May 2019 – Maria McNamara (UCC) ***FIELD TRIP***: 17th-19th May: Geology of the Burren with Dr.…

Read More Event Updates!

Notices

The IGA invites you to an ACADEMIC POSTER MAKING WORKSHOP, at the RED COW, Saturday, 16 FEBRUARY 2019, all day from 09:30hrs. Fee €100. KEY WORDS – IGA, Irish Geological Association, IGRM, Irish Geological Research Meeting, Geology, Academic Poster Making, Graphic Design, Tuition, Workshop WHO:         The IRISH GEOLOGICAL ASSOCIATION invites students to: WHAT:       an ACADEMIC POSTER MAKING WORKSHOP THAT…

Read More ACADEMIC POSTER MAKING WORKSHOP – 16th February 2019, Red Cow Moran Hotel.

Abstract: Iron has been one of the most important materials available in Ireland for over a thousand years. Until the 16th century, iron was made in small clay bloomery furnaces, but in the 17th and 18th centuries the industry was based on the much larger water-powered charcoal-fueled blast furnace. This talk will give an overview of the history of this…

Read More Lecture: 6th February 2019 – “The Blast Furnace in 17th and 18th Century Ireland” by Paul Rondelez (Director of the Irish Mining Heritage Trust)

PLEASE NOTE DATE CHANGE! LECTURE NOW ON 19TH DECEMBER! Abstract: Volcanic ash (tephra) produced by explosive eruptions may be transported by wind and deposited thousands of kilometers from its source to form marker layers in time. These tephra layers may be used to link and to date geological, palaeoecological, palaeoclimatic, and archaeological sequences and events, including whether the transition from…

Read More LECTURE on December 19th: ““Tephra! Linking Neanderthals to Magma Chambers” by Dr. Emma Tomlinson (TCD)

Abstract: Tsunamis can be caused by movements of large portions of submerged slopes, and geologists are now realising that underwater landslides are more common than once thought. Until now, we have been studying slope failures from research ships at the sea surface, several hundreds of metres above the landslide scarps themselves. Wouldn’t it be better if we were able to walk…

Read More Lecture on November 7th: “Walking” Among Underwater Landslide Scars by Dr. Aggeliki ‘Aggie’ Georgiopoulou (UCD)